Archive for Data Security

Facebook Ads That Target Your Beliefs

In a new trial involving a small number of users in the UK, Facebook has said that it will be testing the targeting of adverts based on users’ specific political and religious beliefs.


According to Facebook, the trial will help the social media platform to process and manage its customer data, so that it will be in a better position to ensure compliance with GDPR when it comes into force in May this year.

The severity of the fines associated with the enforcement of GDPR for large companies such as Facebook e.g. a fine for a breach of up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual turnover, whichever is greater, is likely to be a big motivator behind a trial that could improve how Facebook processes and stores data.

How Could Targeting Adverts This Way Be Of Help?

The trial appears to be using adverts for consenting participants to focus on testing and improving how the company handles the required greater consent from data subjects that GDPR will bring, and to ensure that sensitive data is better protected.

One other important result of the trial will be to enable the testing of facial recognition. Facebook is exploring how it can successfully give users an opt-in for facial recognition, which will form part of a measure to stop online impersonations by informing users whenever their faces have been used elsewhere on the site.

The Trial

It has been reported that the trial will work by first asking a number of UK users for permission to allow advertisers to target them on the basis of their political and religious beliefs, and their listed interests.

It is understood that Facebook will also ask users whether they are happy for their public information that identifies them (e.g. their faith and politics) to remain visible for everyone and, if permission is given, Facebook will provide an opt-in for allowing the information to be used to personalise content, and also act as one of the signals for relevant suggesting ads. This will include targeted advertising based upon things like politics, sexuality and faith.


Some people have expressed fear that opting-in to elements of the trial could enable extremists to use targeted advertising for recruitment propaganda. Facebook has denied this.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

This story is more proof that the seriousness of the implications of GDPR is hitting home, particularly with those companies that stand to lose in a big way if they are found not to be compliant. Although the subject of targeted advertising is an emotive one that can make us feel a bit uneasy as Internet users in terms of privacy, it is at least good news that this Facebook trial could lead to better protection of our personal data by a platform that arguably knows more about us than most.

With X-day now past this story should be another reminder that its time for companies everywhere to think about double-checking that their own systems and procedures will be GDPR compliant.

Location Based Marketing … Creepy?

MoviePass CEO, Mitch Lowe, has caused controversy by telling the Hollywood audience at the Entertainment Finance Forum that his MoviePass app can track and gather information about users before and after their trip to the movies.

What Is MoviePass?

MoviePass, based in New York, offers a service whereby, for a flat monthly fee ($9.95 per month), users can go and watch unlimited number of movies in cinemas, with some restrictions. It could be described as a kind of Netflix for moviegoers.

Location Tracking

According to the MoviePass CEO, the company’s app has location-tracking built-in. What some commentators have described as ‘creepy’ though is that the app can track your movements long before and after you’ve been to watch a movie.


What MoviePass prefers to call ‘location-based marketing’ is reportedly being used to improve the customer’s experience of the service and create more opportunities for subscribers to enjoy all the various elements of what the company thinks make up a good movie night. The company says that by tracking customers and gathering data along the way, it can “create a full-featured movie-going experience”.


The big idea is that subscribers may want refreshments before or after the movie, and may have to travel some distance to the cinema. By knowing a subscriber’s location and route, MoviePass can then, via the phone app, give the subscriber details like discounts on transportation, finding places to park nearby, coupons for nearby restaurants, and other similar opportunities.

What Kind Of Data Is Gathered?

According to online reporting of CEO Lowe’s speech, as well as your location, the MoviePass app is also capable of gathering “an enormous amount of information,” which includes your address, which Mr. Lowe says can be used for demographic information.


What MoviePass may see as a kind of personalised, helpful marketing idea, critics appear to see as a potentially dangerous invasion of privacy that could have security consequences for MoviePass subscribers.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

Using new technology to improve marketing and customer experiences is all very well, but the point here is that customers need to be informed exactly what happens to their data, what is collected by the app, how it’s stored and for how long. This will enable them to make an informed choice, give consent, or decline. In a time when cyber-crime and data mismanagement and theft appear to be rife, customers value their privacy and data security more than ever. Companies need to be transparent about their intentions and methods, and need to be able to show customers that they can be trusted with their valuable personal data.

Also, in this case, it appeared to come as a shock about the capabilities of the app, and to some commentators, it may have appeared to be an inappropriate way and style to reveal what the app is capable of. This is likely to prompt complaints from some customers, and could harm the reputation of MoviePass.

If you are worried about the security implications of apps of this kind, for example, you could try to limit location data collection by going into your phone’s app settings. One other, obvious way to avoid any problems with the app would be to avoid MoviePass for now.

The introduction of GDPR in May this year is also likely to have implications for how MoviePass deals with the data of any EU citizen subscribers, as the company will need to comply with the new Regulation.

One Hour To Take Down Illegal Content

New measures by the EU will mean that technology companies will have as little as just one hour to take down illegal and terror content, or face penalties under new legislation.

Why Only One Hour?

The new measure, which has reportedly been met with dismay by the big tech companies such as Google and Facebook (who will arguably be most seriously affected), is focused mainly on terror-related content. The logic is that because terrorist content is considered to be most harmful in the first hours of its appearance online, all companies will, therefore, be required to remove such content within only one hour from its referral, as a general rule.

Other illegal content that is being targeted by the new measures includes incitement to hatred and violence, child sexual abuse material, counterfeit products and copyright infringement content.

3 Months To Report Back

As well as the news that tech companies must remove the most serious content within one hour, the EC has also announced that any tech company that is responsible for people posting content online will have only three months from now to report back to the EU on what they were doing to meet the new targets it has set.

Operational Measures

The EC recommendations are that a set of operational measures will be used to ensure faster detection and removal of illegal content online, to reinforce the cooperation between companies, trusted flaggers and law enforcement authorities, and to increase transparency and safeguards for citizens. These operational measures will be:

  • Clearer ‘notice and action’ procedures. Companies should set out easy and transparent rules for notifying illegal content. These should include fast-track procedures for ‘trusted flaggers’. Also, to avoid unintended removal of content which is not illegal, content providers should be informed about such decisions and have the opportunity to contest them.
  • More efficient tools and proactive technologies. This means that companies should set out clear notification systems for users. These should include proactive tools to detect and remove illegal content, in particular for terrorism-related content and for content which does not need contextualisation to be deemed illegal, such as child sexual abuse material or counterfeited goods.
  • Stronger safeguards to ensure rights. To ensure that decisions to remove content are accurate and well-founded, companies should put in place effective and appropriate safeguards. These should include human oversight and verification, in full respect of fundamental rights, freedom of expression and data protection rules.
  • Special attention to small companies. The technology industry should, through voluntary arrangements, cooperate and share experiences, best practices and technological solutions, and this shared responsibility should particularly benefit smaller platforms with more limited resources and expertise.
  • Closer cooperation with authorities. If there is evidence of a serious criminal offence or a suspicion that illegal content is posing a threat to life or safety, companies will be required to promptly inform law enforcement authorities, and EC Member States should establish the appropriate legal obligations.

The recommendations are in addition to on-going work with the technology industry through voluntary initiatives to ensure that the internet is free of illegal content, and are intended to reinforce actions taken under different initiatives.

Response From The Tech Industry

Although Facebook has said that it shares the European Commission’s goal, the industry association EDiMA, (which includes Facebook, Google, and Twitter) has stressed that the one-hour turn-around time could harm the effectiveness of service providers’ take-down systems rather than help.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

As the Vice-President for the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip has pointed out, online platforms have become many people’s main gateway to information. For this reason, and if we accept that what is illegal offline is also illegal online, many people feel that these widely used technology platfoms now have a responsibility to provide a secure environment for their users. Many businesses are advertisers on these platforms, and are likely to share a desire to rid them of illegal content.

While some popular tech platforms have continued to resist what some see as too much censorship, interference, or over-regulation, the frequency and severity of terrorist attacks in Europe and the role and influence of platforms in spreading information, true or false (e.g. the US election) has given governments the fuel, impetus, and feeling of justification to try and apply more force to tech companies. The EC’s view is that the spread of illegal content online undermines the trust of citizens in the Internet and poses security threats, and the new operational measures could, along with any self-regulation, speed up the process of clearing illegal content.

The scale and frequency of illegal content posting has posed serious cost and resources challenges to tech platforms in recent years.

Blockchain Used To Reduce Child Labour

Blockchain Used To Reduce Child Labour Blockchain, the same technology that powers the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, is being tested in a pilot project between car-maker BMW and start-up Circulor with a view to eliminating battery minerals produced using child labour.

What Is Blockchain?

Blockchain is an incorruptible peer-to-peer network (a kind of ledger) that allows multiple parties to transfer value in a secure and transparent way. Blockchain’s Co-Founder Nic Carey describes Blockchain as being like “a big spreadsheet in the cloud that anyone can use, but no one can erase or modify”.

Battery Mineral Problem

The pilot between BMW and Circulor is focusing on reducing child labour by finding a way to avoid using any cobalt that is mined in unregulated artisanal mines in Democratic Republic of Congo. At the moment one fifth of cobalt is mined in a way that often uses child labour.

How Can Blockchain Help?

The pilot project is using Blockchain to help provide a way to prove that artisanal miners are not using child labour in their cobalt mining activities.

Each bag of cobalt produced by an artisanal miner will be given a digital tag. This tag will be entered into Blockchain using a mobile phone. The details of the digital tag will then be entered by each link in the chain of buyers, thereby providing a clear, verifiable trail, all the way from miner to smelter. Since Blockchain is ‘incorruptible’, provided all organizations throughout the supply chain will be involved in the project, the Blockchain evidence should be accurate.


Challenges to the system being tested in the pilot could include cobalt mined by a child could simply being mixed in with ‘clean’ cobalt prior to processing.

Used In Similar Industries

There is every reason to think that Blockchain could help with ethical cobalt mining and supply because it has been used in a similar way by the diamond industry to provide a forgery-proof record of a diamond’s lifecycle.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

The Blockchain technology has always shown huge promise, beyond simply being used in digital currencies. One of its key strengths is that trust is embedded into the incorruptible system. This means that businesses can use it to categorically prove a certain source and route for e.g. delivery, raw materials or production. This could be particularly valuable to businesses where provenance of some kind is necessary to add to the monetary, ethical or other value of a product or service.

After first being used in the financial, legal and public sectors, Blockchain is now being used by businesses and organisations around the world in many other different ways such as:

  • Using the data on a Blockchain ledger to record the temperature of sensitive medicines being transported from manufacturers to hospitals in hot climates. The ‘incorruptible’ aspect of the Blockchain data gives a clear record of care and responsibility along the whole supply chain.
  • Using an IBM-based Blockchain ledger to record data about wine certification, ownership and storage history. This has helped to combat fraud in the industry and has provided provenance and re-assurance to buyers.
  • Shipping Company Maersk using a Blockchain-based system for tracking consignments that addresses visibility and efficiency i.e. digitising a formerly paper-based process that involved multiple interactions.
  • Start-up company ‘Electron’ building a Blockchain-based system for sharing information between those involved in supplying energy which could speed up and simplify the supplier switching process. It may also be used for smart grid processes, such as local load-balancing of supply and demand.
  • Australian start-up Zimrii developing a Blockchain-based service that allows independent musicians to sell downloads to fans, distribute the proceeds between collaborators, and allow interaction with managers.

Blockchain still has huge untapped potential for all kinds of businesses and could represent a major opportunity to improve services, and effectively tackle visibility, transparency and efficiency issues.

Belgium Says No To Facebook Tracking Code

A court in Belgium has told Facebook to stop using tracking code to follow and record internet use by people surfing in Belgium, until it complies with the country’s own privacy laws.

What’s The Problem?

According to Belgium’s privacy watchdog, the Belgian Commission for the Protection of Privacy (CPP), Facebook placed tracking code in the form of ‘cookies’ on third-party websites. This would mean that Facebook’s actions did not comply with Belgium’s privacy laws because:

  • It tracked people without consent.
  • It tracked people who were not Facebook users.
  • It (presumably) stored the tracked personal data that it obtained illegally in the first place.

What Now?

If Facebook fails to comply with Belgium’s CPP it could face fines of £221,000 per day.

Industry Standard

Facebook is reported to have expressed disappointment at the verdict and has stated that it is simply using the same industry standard cookies and pixels that other EU businesses use to help them grow their business.


This latest case appears to be the latest round in a long-running, ongoing dispute between the social media giant and the CPP. For example, back in November 2015, the CPP won a case against Facebook concerning the tracking of people with a ‘datr cookie’ when they visited pages on the site and clicked on like or share, even if they had never registered for an account, or if they had but weren’t even logged in.

Facebook was able to appeal and win an overturning of the verdict because it was judged that Belgian courts didn’t have international jurisdiction over Facebook Ireland i.e. because the data collected by the cookies was stored on servers in Dublin, the European base of Facebook’s operations.

The CPP then indicated that it would try to appeal against Facebook’s successful appeal through Belgium’s court of cassation, using a Yahoo case as an example. With Yahoo, for example, it was ruled back in 2015 that finding against Yahoo wouldn’t have to mean intervention outside of Belgium, and that, since Yahoo actively participated in the economic life of Belgium by using the domain name .be or displaying ads based on users’ location e.g. in Belgium, it voluntarily submitted itself to Belgian law.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

This story has commercial, legal and political aspects to it. Cookies can provide useful information and functions for businesses e.g. helping to personalise user browsing experiences, and gathering information about users of the company website – usually with an initial registration of consent by users of a website.

With this Facebook case, as web users, we may feel uneasy that trusted companies may be tracking all-comers without consent. This kind of story reminds us all about the importance of privacy and security, and its worth remembering that cookies sent over the web without encryption i.e. if the website doesn’t have HTTPS in front of the domain, could be a security risk because they are readable by anyone on a network and could sensitive data e.g. credit card details, e-mail address and more. Google, for example, has just announced that from July, Chrome will be labelling websites without HTTPS as ‘Not Secure’ to try and combat this kind of risk.

The legal aspect of this case relates to which country has jurisdiction over the actions of a company whose services are used in that country, but the HQ and the data storage are in another country. This is another long-running legal argument e.g. Apple’s tax breaks in Ireland.

Many see the EU and people like the EU’s commissioner for competition, and measures like greater regulation and taxation as being useful to curb some of the more suspect behaviour of the big US Internet companies in Europe.

The introduction of GDPR should also provide greater protection for EU citizens in terms of online privacy and security. The UK will soon not be an EU member, but will have its own similar Bill added to UK law, but this could produce more legal grey areas.

There is clearly a political dimension to this story too as Belgium seeks to hold a powerful overseas company to account, and it wouldn’t be the first time that an EU country has tried to do this.

Adopt ‘HTTPS’ Or Face Being Penalised by Google

Google has announced that websites without ‘HTTPS’ in front of their domains will be labelled as ‘Not Secure’ in version 48 of Chrome, starting this July.

What Is HTTPS and Why Does It Matter?

HTTPS stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure. It is the secure version of HTTP, the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to, which means that all communications between your browser and the website you visit are encrypted.

In practical and technical terms, having HTTPS in front of your website URL means that:

  • Every unprotected HTTP request could reveal information about the behaviours and identities of your users. With HTTPS, therefore, critical security and data integrity for both your websites and your users’ personal information is provided. For example, no one with access to your router or ISP can get in the middle and intercept information sent to websites, spy on what you’re doing, or inject malware into legitimate pages.
  • Intruders (benign and malignant), now target every unprotected resource between your website and users e.g. images, cookies, scripts, and HTML. HTTPS provides a kind of blanket protection. ‘Intruders’ could include intentionally malicious attackers, as well as legitimate but intrusive companies e.g. ISPs or hotels that inject adverts into pages.
  • HTTPS doesn’t just block misuse of your website, but it is now also a requirement for many cutting-edge features, and is an enabling technology for app-like capabilities such as service workers, or building progressive web apps.
  • Many older APIs are now being updated to require permission to execute e.g. geolocation API. HTTPS is, therefore, a main component to the permission workflows for both new features and updated APIs.

Naming and Shaming

Google’s Chrome Security Product Manager, Emily Schechter, has announced on the Google Blog that, as from July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68, Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as “not secure”. Google has played down this more direct move as being simply another step in a progression that has seen it gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as “not secure” over the last year. Those companies and organisations that have not yet got their secure certificates may, however, be left thinking that this looks more like a naming and shaming.

Google isn’t the only company to adopt this kind of tactic. Mozilla took a similar approach sites using HTTP back in December with Firefox Nightly version 59.


The cost of secure certificates varies e.g. popular host GoDaddy offers HTTPS for one website for around £44 per year (£55 when you renew it). Google’s blog post avoids discussion of the cost, and focuses more on the benefits, the risks of not getting one, and makes the point that secure certificates are now more affordable than ever.

According to Google’s figures, many sites have already switched to HTTPS, with a reported 68% of Chrome traffic on Android and Windows now protected, 78% of Chrome traffic on Chrome OS and Mac now protected, and 81 of the top 100 sites on the web now using HTTPS by default.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

Clearly, any thought that a secure certificate will only be needed by websites that directly take payments is likely to be wrong. Google is committed to making HTTS the default standard – on its blog it says ‘a secure web is here to stay’. The fear for businesses, in addition to the fear of cyber attacks, is that if you don’t have HTTPS for your business website soon, it could suffer in the search engine rankings, and potential customers could be scared away by visual warnings that the site is somehow, suddenly not secure. For smaller businesses this could be particularly damaging.

If having HTTPS reduces the risk of cyber crime then the benefits of buying a secure certificate will outweigh the cost, but for many smaller businesses, this may feel like they are being forced to pay an extra cost each year, and it may also force cyber criminals to change their tactics e.g. move more into social engineering attacks, and perhaps turn to AI-powered attack methods.

Cryptojacking Discovered On Government Websites

A UK security researcher has discovered that cyber criminals have been using public sector websites, including that of the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office for cryptojacking.

What Is Cryptojacking?

Typically, cryptojacking involves hackers / scammers installing ‘mining script’ code such as Coin Hive, into multiple web pages without the knowledge of the website owners. The compromised website then runs the cryptomining code, which is written in JavaScript, inside the victim’s web browser when they visit the website. The scammer is then able to get multiple computers to join their networks so that the combined computing power will enable them to solve mathematical problems. Whichever scammer is first to solve these problems is then able to claim / generate cash in the form of crypto-currency.

If, for example, a website is able to get one million visitors a month, and if the Coin Hive Web Miner for Monero (XMR) is used, it could generate an income of £88 in the Monero crypto-currency.

Modified BrowseAloud Plugin

In this latest discovery by security researcher Scott Helme, criminals were found to be using a modified version of the BrowseAloud plugin to enable crypotojacking through government websites. The BrowseAloud plugin is normally used to make websites more accessible to visually impaired people, but in this case, attackers were found to have planted malicious code to the JavaScript file to use the browser CPU in an attempt to illegally generate cryptocurrency.

It is thought that criminals targeted this plugin because public sector websites need to comply with legal obligations to make their information accessible to people with disabilities.

Which Government Websites?

A recent investigation has discovered that around 5,000 websites are being targeted using this kind of cryptojacking. The government websites affected include the websites of the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), NHS websites, the General Medical Council website, some UK local council websites, the Student Loans Company site, some Australian government department websites, and the even the US Courts website.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

Many businesses and organisations simply aren’t able to see and take account of all of the ways they can be attacked externally. Also, it’s not always easy to understand what belongs to your organisation, how it is connected to the rest of your asset inventory, and what potential vulnerabilities are exposed to compromise.

The increased CPU usage and slowing down of computers caused by mining scripts waste time and money for businesses. There are, however, some simple measures that your business can take to avoid being exploited as part of this kind of scam.
If, for example, you are using an ad blocker on your computer, you can set it to block one specific JavaScript URL which is This will stop the miner from running without stopping you from using any of the websites that you normally visit.

Also, a dedicated browser extension called ‘No Coin’ is available for Chrome, Firefox and Opera. This will stop the Coin Hive mining code being used through your browser. This extension comes with a white-list and an option to pause the extension should you wish to do so.

Coin Hive’s developers have also said that they would like people to report any malicious use of Coin Hive to them.
Maintaining vigilance for unusual computer symptoms, keeping security patches updated, and raising awareness within your company of current scams and what to do to prevent them, are just some of the ways that you could maintain a basic level of protection for your business.

Digital threat management software is also an option that can help companies to continuously discover an inventory of their externally facing digital assets, and to manage the risks across the entire attack surface.

X-Day February 15th – Prepare For GDPR

Network services provider EfficientIP has warned businesses that, in reality, February 15th is the last day that organisations can ensure their real-world compliance with GDPR.

I Thought May 25th Was The Deadline?

May 25th is the actual date that companies and organisations need to ensure that they are compliant with GDPR. However, the point that EfficientIP made in an announcement last week is that, realistically, it actually takes 99 days to detect a data breach. This gives hackers time to ‘exfiltrate’ data, or remove it without detection. Taking this into account, February 15th is exactly 100 days before May 25th 2018, and could, therefore, be regarded as the last day organisations can ensure real-world compliance with GDPR.

Dubbed ‘X-Day’

With this point in mind, some Cyber Security experts have started referring to February 15th as “X-Day” because it is the last day companies can prevent data exfiltration attacks without potential prosecution by regulators.

What Is Data Exfiltration?

Data exfiltration is the unauthorized copying, transfer or retrieval of data from a computer or server. In other words, hackers can use the DNS protocol to very quickly transfer large amounts of personal and sensitive data from your company systems e.g. customer data such as credit card numbers, or company information such as financial records.

EfficientIP have pointed out that most of the companies breached after February 15th 2018 will only discover the attack after GDPR is in force, and will, therefore, (legally) only have 72 hours to publicly disclose the breach.

How Common is Exfiltration?

EfficientIP’s own research shows that as much as 24% of companies have suffered data exfiltration in the past year.

Positive View

Although the EfficientIP is a warning, and companies already know that failing to comply with GDPR will bring large fines, and data breaches can cause irreparable damage to a company and its reputation, there are some very positive reasons for preparing now for GDPR. For example, a recent Veritas survey showed 95% of decision-makers expect a positive outcome from GDPR compliance, and 92% think they would benefit from having better data hygiene.

68% of respondents in the Veritas survey also said that getting GDPR compliant would give them a better insight into their business, which could help to improve the customer experience, and that compliance could actually save the company money.

Getting Motivated

It’s all very well issuing worrying warnings, but companies not yet compliant need to find effective ways to drive the cultural and organisational changes needed to get to grips with GDPR going forward. These motivators, also highlighted in a recent Veritas survey, could include adding compliance to employee contracts (47%), implementing disciplinary action if the regulation is disobeyed (41%), and educating employees about the benefits of GDPR (40%).

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

GDPR is just around the corner and this ‘X-Day’ warning is an indicator that realistically, GDPR compliance shouldn’t be put off any longer.

Data management commentators suggest that companies should adopt an automated, classification-based, policy-driven approach to GDPR so that they can meet the regulatory demands within the short time frame available.

Businesses have now heard all the warnings, and many companies and organisations are now starting come around to the idea of focusing on the positive outcomes and benefits that GDPR compliance will bring such as increased revenues, resulting from improved customer loyalty, heightened brand reputation, and competitive differentiation in the market.

There is also now growing realisation that companies will prefer to have business relationships with GDPR compliant companies to help ensure their own compliance. This means that GDPR compliance will be become a basic necessity to enable companies to compete in a normal way in today’s business environment.

Google Glass Released in the UK

Google Glass has gone on sale in the UK, with “creative” consumers and developers alike capable of getting their hands on the android-based technology if they’re willing to part with £1000. The UK release has led to further concerns regarding the privacy aspects of Glass.

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Google Glass’ privacy debate is still open for discussion, especially as there is little way of knowing exactly when someone might be taking a picture of you, or when your personal details might be stolen through the built-in camera, such as when you’re putting in a PIN of some sorts.

Also, there’s still confusion surrounding the legal implications of Google Glass, which has led to Google telling the first users of the product to maintain the same level of courtesy and standards they would when taking a picture with a camera or mobile phone.

Interestingly, in a poll connected to the privacy concerns of Google Glass in the US, 72% of Americans felt that there was a cause for concern when it came to feeling awkward or concerned about their privacy.

However, Google have stressed that Glass is still a prototype and that its valuation reflects the fact that it is meant for developers rather than consumers, so we could see changes to its privacy settings in the future.

This also means that the commercial value of the product will be significantly less than the £1000 you have to pay in the UK at this time.

How Dedicated Network Connections For The Cloud Could Save Businesses A Lot Of Worry

Whilst the cloud has been utilised by companies all over the world, many business owners are still left feeling a little uneasy with the idea of having important data on the wrong side of their own personal security protocols.

The hybrid-cloud, an alternative to standard cloud computing, allows companies to retain some of their vital digital information in house by having total control and utilising their own defences against any potential security threat to their stored data.

Despite this, companies need more from the cloud to have the assurance that they don’t have to look after their precious data themselves.


The answer could come from new network services, which are being offered by cloud-service providers to create a connection between the clients infrastructure and the PoP (Points of Presence) of the provider.

These dedicated connections, rather than the standard internet pathway, mean that clients would not have to share their bandwidth with anyone else, can increase and decrease their bandwidth as they please and benefit from easily-transferable data that eliminates internet insecurities.

These dedicated connections between provider and client are not new and are well tested, so companies can feel more assured about the data they store on the cloud by following up this type of data storage service.

For more information on Safe & Secure Cloud Storage Services, get in touch with Pronetic today and we’ll take you through our various technology options for your business.